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Tag: camera

Camera Shake Effect in Unity

Reading Time: 5 minutes

One of the most important things in every game, that gives each player a feeling of diving into gameplay, is a feedback. Game feedback can be expressed in many different ways but the main idea behind is the same – the player must feel that the game reacts on any action or event that happens. Feedbacks can be different, starting with a sound or visual effect and ending with narrative or storyline changes.

A couple of real examples where the feedback is missing:

  • FPS. The player shoots but the gun stays frozen on the screen. To add some realism the gun can simulate kickback with an appropriate animation.
  • Horror game. The player goes through the typical “dangerous” tunnel and at the end of it meets the creature and begins a fight. And game turns into “hack and slash”, but having creepy sound effects in the tunnel can make a real horror-like atmosphere.

Usually, a good feedback does not need to be difficult or complex. It is even vice versa, very often it is enough to play a simple sound or shake the camera in some concrete moment and it already can contribute a lot to the gameplay. One very popular example when the player expects to have a feedback is damage infliction. When someone hits you, you want to know this. This feedback is usually implemented as a camera shake, that simulates a head shake after hit. From the first sight it seems not very clear how to simulate this but in Unity it can be done in one line of code!

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Using multiple cameras in Unity

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Game Development is full of surprises. Completely different problems can be solved with the help of a pretty similar solutions. Let’s take two examples:

  1. Post Effects. This is a very powerful mechanism of adjusting the rendered picture right before displaying it on the screen. Using the effects it is pretty easy to add the fog or increase the brightness, etc. But in case if the game screen displays not only the environment but also some UI elements (health bar, number of points, etc) it turns to be a problem to apply the effects only to the particular part of the picture skipping UI.
     
  2. First Person Shooter. Having first person view in the game the player always sees own gun. This gun is usually attached to the player’s model. The model itself has a collider that interacts with the environment (detects collisions and prohibits passing through the walls, etc). In case if the player has to come up to the wall very closely it can happen that the gun can pass through the wall. Having a separate collider attached to the gun would not solve the problem since it would block the player from coming close to the wall.

But how to deal with these, at first sight, different problems?

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